The Chopra Center Newsletter     Mar 2012 Edition 

SPECIALLY THEMED SEDUCTION OF SPIRITS ARE ONLY OFFERED IN 2012

This year we have carefully selected a special theme for each of our three Seduction of Spirit retreats. Each Seduction of Spirit includes the core elements of meditation, yoga, sutra instruction by Deepak, and other practices for inner calm and expanded awareness. In addition, each individual retreat will feature new experiences, individual and group activities, guest experts, and life-transforming tools and techniques related to the retreat’s guiding theme.

Music and Meditation
April 22–28, 2012
La Costa Resort & Spa, Carlsbad, CA

Music and Meditation is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fully immerse yourself in the gifts of music and meditation, as you commune with the divine music in your heart and the inner silence of your soul.

Pathway to Happiness
July 9–15, 2012
Eaglewood Resort & Spa, Chicago, IL

Happiness is something we all desire, yet it eludes many of us because we don’t know where to look. At this July's Seduction of Spirit, Deepak Chopra; author Mike Dooley; and master Chopra Center instructors will guide you in discovering your own pathway to happiness, which always lies within.

Discover Your Purpose
October 29–November 4, 2012
La Costa Resort & Spa, Carlsbad, CA

At this unique retreat, learn the timeless practices for connecting to your deepest self, that wise aspect of your being that knows who you are, why you’re here, and how you can use your gifts for the greatest benefit and fulfillment of everyone in your life – including yourself.

Introducing Deepak Chopra's new book,
Spiritual Solutions . . .



Life is full of challenges, both big and small. Spirituality is here to offer solutions.

Over the course of his career as physician, teacher, and bestselling author, Deepak Chopra has received thousands of questions from people facing every kind of challenge, including:

  • How to lead a more fulfilling life
  • Guidance on overcoming relationship problems and personal obstacles
  • The best way to deal with a passive-aggressive friend
  • How to jump-start a stagnant career
  • Finding time for meditation

Hidden among all of these questions are answers waiting to be uncovered.

In this groundbreaking book, Deepak Chopra shows you how to expand your awareness, which is the key to the confusion and conflict we all face. “The secret is that the level of the problem is never the level of the solution,” he writes. By rising to the level of the solution in your own awareness, you can transform obstacles into opportunities. In Spiritual Solutions, you will learn how to discover your true self, where peace, clarity, and wisdom serve as guides in times of crisis.

In Deepak’s perspective, spirituality is primarily about consciousness, not about religious dogma or relying on the conventional notion of God. “There is no greater power for success and personal growth than your own awareness,” he observes. With practical insight, Spiritual Solutions provides the tools and strategies to enable you to meet life’s challenges from within and to experience a sense of genuine fulfillment and purpose.

“Great advice directly from the master on virtually any subject, it just doesn't get any better than this, and all in common sense language. I love this book.”
~Wayne W Dyer

“The path to address the external conflicts of our world is to first address our own internal conflicts with compassion and resolve. This book points a light on that path that is vital to our time.” ~Dylan Ratigan

Decoding Deepak
A New Documentary Film
by Gotham Chopra

Premiering at Seduction of Spirit, April 22-28, 2012
Learn More here >>

Decoding Deepak: The Journey
by Gotham Chopra

Last week, someone approached my dad at one of his speaking events and said to him, “I heard your son made a movie about you.”

He told me he smiled back at the person and replied: “Actually, he made a movie about himself.”

As much as I hate to admit it, he may be onto something.

It was about a year and half ago that I set out to Bangkok with a my dad, a creative partner named Mark Rinehart that I’d only met about 10 days earlier, some cameras and tape, and the vague notion of making a movie about my father that would reconcile the strange pop cultural icon he’s become to the world vs. the real man I thought I knew. A few days later, while spending the days interviewing my dad in quiet gardens at the 5-star Peninsula Hotel and then the nights with Mark rolling film on the neon blitzed sex market of central Bangkok, I realized I was trying to reconcile something much bigger.

As is the habit the has made my dad a bestselling author, he could wrap lyrical poetry around the frames of the film we’d started shooting, and yet the substance of those frames was often all too visceral — teenagers selling themselves in dank alleyways, Japanese tourists chasing young boys deep into maze of Bangkok’s endless underground. As has often been the case in my life, I struggled to balance the deep philosophical insight of my father with all too often horrible realities of real life on planet earth. Maybe that’s what the film really need to be about.

That’s the thing about documentaries: You start with one thesis and quickly find yourself tracking something entirely different. Don’t get me wrong — my film Decoding Deepak is very much a journey into the identify of my father Deepak Chopra, the guy my sister and I have called ‘papa’ all of our life, even while people like Lady Gaga and Kim Kardashian started to call him their guru in the last few years.

After those triply days in Thailand, I tracked my dad around the world several times over. Thailand, Japan, India, not to mention places like NYC, Sedona, San Diego, Los Angeles and elsewhere. But even as the scenery continued to change from city to city, country to country, I saw that my dad hadn’t. Wherever we went, he kept on talking about whatever it is he talks about: consciousness, quantum entanglement, plank scale geometry. In and of itself it was sort of interesting, the inside of a rabbit always is, right? And yet the same nagging doubt crept into me — that my movie had to be about something more than the existential Truman Show I’ve always suspected I’ve lived in. This movie couldn’t just be about my dad, it had to be about my finding him… which, indeed, really would make it about me.

There’s precedent for this, a history of Indian gurus popularized in the west — Ramana Maharishi, Swami Vivekananda, and more recently Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Osho, and these days a guy who goes by the name Sri Sri. By and large they’ll have the same look – the saffron robes, long hair, and cheery smiles. It’s probably why I could never really think of my dad as one of them. That and… I mean, he’s my dad.

But traveling the world with him the last year, I started to realize that maybe my dad was indeed one of them, maybe he was some Indian Guru as strange as that may be. He just didn’t have the robe and long hair. He has sparkly glasses, red sneakers, and a crew cut. Be not alarmed, I’m not trying to tell you that I’m now a follower of my father or convinced he’s some prophet. Far from it. But you’ll have to watch the movie to glean my final verdict on that front.

But in looking more closely at my father, I was reminded of something Osho once said. Like my father and many of his Indian spiritual predecessors, Osho had his detractors, people who called him a “snake oil salesmen,” “fraud,” and “prophet for profit.” Osho shrugged it off. He claimed to think of those that loved and hated him with the same relative detachment. “They see in me,” he said, “what they want to see. They see in me that which they either love or hate in themselves.”

Indeed, that right there is very much he story of the spiritual guru. I think (hope) it’s the story of my father and my movie too. In my search for him, I did in fact start to search for myself. I stopped looking to him for answers about the atrocities of Bangkok and looked deeper into myself for them. I stopped wondering about what Lady Gaga saw in him, and started to find what I did.

And now I’ve realized something else about my movie. When it’s all said in done, when the final credits roll on the film, I hope I’ll actually prove my dad wrong. Because I don’t want this movie to be about him. Or me. I want it to be about you. See in it what you want to see in it, what you want see in yourself.

Reprinted from Gotham Chopra’s blog on intent.com.

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